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Frog Eats Beetle. Beetle Crawls Through Guts to Escape

The nice thing about being a frog is that you don’t have to chew your food—just gulp, and down the hatch. The problematic thing about being a frog is that you don’t have to chew your food, which means that if you’ve happened to nab the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata, your food might come out […]

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What Poetry Means for Doctors and Patients During a Pandemic

When Rafael Campo took over as poetry editor at The Journal of the American Medical Association a little over a year ago, he wasn’t expecting to field quite so many submissions. (Yes, in between case reports and clinical trial results, JAMA publishes original poetry in every issue.) Some of the poems are charming and poignant, […]

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SpaceX Brings Astronauts Home Safely in a Historic First

During the descent, the capsule’s heat shield experienced temperatures above 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit as it used the atmosphere as a brake to reduce its speed from 17,000 to just 350 miles per hour. Once the capsule was about three miles above the surface—half the cruising altitude of a passenger jet—it deployed its small drogue parachutes […]

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Archaeologists Have Found the Source of Stonehenge’s Boulders

The huge slabs of stone that make up the most iconic structures at Stonehenge came from about 25km away, according to chemical analysis. Since the 1500s, most Stonehenge scholars have assumed the 6- to 7-meter tall, 20-metric-ton sarsen stones came from nearby Marlborough Downs, and a recent study by University of Brighton archaeologist David Nash […]

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What Can Ants and Bees Teach Us About Containing Disease?

This story originally appeared on Undark and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Given that she infects ant colonies with deadly pathogens and then studies how they respond, one might say that Nathalie Stroeymeyt, a senior lecturer in the school of biological sciences at the University of Bristol in the U.K., specializes in miniature […]

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What is Crispr Gene Editing? The Complete WIRED Guide

Before long, DuPont bought the Danish company that Barrangou worked for and began using strains carrying this naturally occurring Crispr to protect all of its yogurt and cheese cultures. Since DuPont owns about 50 percent of the global dairy culture market, you’ve probably already eaten Crispr-optimized cheese on your pizza. 3 (Non–Gene Editing) Uses for […]

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The Anglerfish Deleted Its Immune System to Fuse With Its Mate

There are few animals more bizarre than the anglerfish, a species that has so much trouble finding a mate that when the male and female do connect underwater, males actually fuse their tissue with the females for life. After the merger, the two share a single respiratory and digestive system. Now scientists have discovered that […]

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What the Science of Animal Networks Reveals About Protests

The living world turns chaos into order by making large structures out of small units. The sublime coordination of a flock of birds or a school of fish—built iteratively from the twitches and bumps of single individuals—turns instinctive behaviors into something vast and graceful. It’s not just for show. A lone gazelle can’t evade a […]

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NASA Just Launched Its New Perseverance Rover to Mars

Perseverance will enter the tenuous Martian atmosphere going more than 10,000 miles per hour, which means that as it slices through the air it will experience temperatures of nearly 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit. “The heat shield really takes the brunt of hitting the atmosphere,” says Tice of the lander’s protective structure. But if it works as […]

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A Study Finds Sex Differences in the Brain. Does It Matter?

And without an obvious medical benefit, Eliot thinks this type of research will simply reinforce the idea that men and women are fundamentally different, or even justify misogyny—although the authors may not intend such an outcome. This research is “far from having medical value,” she says. Instead, it can “validate the fixed, hardwired, God-given—however you […]

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Some Countries Reopened Schools. What Did They Learn About Kids and Covid?

Other countries, like Israel, opened schools at the same time that restrictions were lifted in May on surrounding communities, which led to Covid-19 outbreaks that had infected 1,335 Israeli students and 691 staff as of July 15. In Israel, schools reopened without masking or social distancing rules, according to The Wall Street Journal, and allowed […]

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The Sly Psychology Behind Magicians’ Card Tricks

Pick a card, any card. It’s a staple of traditional magic tricks. But if you choose the three of diamonds, chances are you may have been “primed” by the magician to pick that card without even being aware of it. That’s because certain subtle verbal and gestural cues can unconsciously influence decision-making, according to a […]

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