Advertisements

What Happens After a ‘Million-Mile Battery’ Outlasts the Car?

This story originally appeared on Grist and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Electric vehicles (EVs) have a clear environmental advantage over their gas-guzzling counterparts, but when it comes to longevity, the two are in a dead heat. Two hundred thousand miles is considered a good, long run for a car built today, regardless […]

Advertisements
Read More

Global Warming. Inequality. Covid-19. And Al Gore Is … Optimistic?

AR: You just said that was a huge opportunity for investing and a business opportunity. Do you not see a tension between so-called Environment, Social and Governance investing and the fiduciary responsibility that institutional investors and executives have to maximize returns? Or do you think that responsibility now actually includes ESG investing? AG: Yes, I […]

Read More

The Epic Siberian Journey to Solve a Mass Extinction Mystery

“I really wanted to find this place that was rumored where there were a lot of rocks that result from explosive volcanic eruptions,” Elkins-Tanton says, “because that’s the only way that we know of that you can effectively drive chemicals into the upper atmosphere where they’ll get spun around the whole planet.” She was closing […]

Read More

The Anthropause: How the Pandemic Gives Scientists a New Way to Study Wildlife

But with the fishers, the behavioral change in the anthropause happened waaaaay too fast to be genetic. Instead, it could be a change driven by choices made by individuals or groups of animals. “You see that personalities differ,” says Wikelski. “There may be now a selection for certain personalities to enter cities, and that may […]

Read More

The Debate Over Burning Dead Trees to Create Biomass Energy

This story originally appeared on Yale Environment 360 and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Jonathan Kusel owns three pickups and a 45-foot truck for hauling woodchip bins. He operates a woodchip yard and a 35-kilowatt biomass plant that burns dead trees, and he runs a crew marking trees for loggers working in national […]

Read More

Why Massive Saharan Dust Plumes Are Blowing Into the US

It doesn’t help matters for any budding hurricanes that the dust in the SAL is absorbing heat from the sun as it travels across the Atlantic, creating still more atmospheric stability. Even worse for hurricanes, they need a calm environment in order to start spinning, but the SAL is barrelling in with 50-mile-per-hour winds. “It […]

Read More

‘Carbon Farming’ Could Make US Agriculture Truly Green

On a farm in north-central Indiana, Brent Bible raises 5,000 acres of corn and soybeans that go into producing ethanol fuel, food additives and seeds. In Napa Valley, California, Kristin Belair picks the best grapes from 50 acres of vineyards to create high-end cabernet sauvignon and sauvignon blanc wines. Both are part of a growing […]

Read More

Why the Arctic Is Warming So Fast, and Why That’s So Alarming

On Saturday, the residents of Verkhoyansk, Russia, marked the first day of summer with 100 degree Fahrenheit temperatures. Not that they could enjoy it, really, as Verkhoyansk is in Siberia, hundreds of miles from the nearest beach. That’s much, much hotter than towns inside the Arctic circle usually get. That 100 degrees appears to be […]

Read More

Who’s to Blame for Plastic Microfiber Pollution?

Instead, they pointed the finger of blame at the washing machines themselves, specifically how water moves through clothes. You might assume that synthetic clothes will shed more microfibers if they’re packed tightly in a big wash, rubbing against one another. But these researchers found that high-efficiency machines, which use less water, also created less fiber […]

Read More

Stuck at Home, Scientists Discover 9 New Insect Species

When the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County shut down due to the pandemic in mid-March, Lisa Gonzalez headed home with the expectation that she would be back in a few weeks. But once it became clear that she wouldn’t get back anytime soon, Gonzalez, the museum’s assistant entomology collection manager, converted her home’s […]

Read More

Ground-Penetrating Radar Mapped a Buried Ancient Roman City

Falerii Novi was once a walled town just north of Rome, likely founded around 241 BC as a relocation site for a Falisci tribe that had rebelled against the Romans. Located on a volcanic plateau, archaeologists surmise that the new site was chosen because it wasn’t as easy to defend, thereby discouraging further uprisings. There […]

Read More

Microtransit Gives City Agencies a Lift During the Pandemic

Some transit systems, for instance, are using low-tech approaches to curb the disease. TransLink in Vancouver, British Columbia, began drawing 6-foot marks at bus stops to show the recommended distance between passengers. Others are amping up cleaning schedules or giving masks to passengers. And digital modeling performed by Allen and colleagues suggests that the viral […]

Read More

In Alaska, Summer’s Getting Too Hot for the Salmon Run

This story originally appeared in High Country News and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Last summer, across southwest Alaska’s Bristol Bay region—home to the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world—tens of thousands of fish washed up dead along riverbanks. Rivers running at temperatures above the threshold for salmon health were killing the […]

Read More

The Covid-19 Economic Slump Is Closing Down Coal Plants

Although small, one analyst thinks the Minnesota battery experiment could be an energy game-changer. “It’s one speculative option,” says Jesse Jenkins, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University, who studies the transition to zero-carbon energy. “It could totally fail, but it’s one example of a utility making a proactive bet.” Meanwhile, Exelon, […]

Read More

Behind the Scenes With the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Master of Jellyfish

There’s perhaps no creature on earth more blissfully unaware of the turmoil humanity is descending into than the jellyfish. I mean, it doesn’t even have a brain, just a simple nervous system that allows it to leisurely pulse around the oceans. Yet a few among the jellies risked getting caught up in the chaos of […]

Read More