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Charge a Car Battery in 5 Minutes? That’s the Plan

Late last year, Formula E officials announced the specs for the third generation of all-electric race cars that will debut on the motorway in 2022. The new Formula E cars will be the first to use extremely fast charging stations that pack enough power to fully charge a Tesla Model S battery in about 10 […]

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Business as Usual Is On Hold—Even at the EPA

2020 has a new motto: “Canceled due to the coronavirus.” Businesses, schools, sports, travel, film, and TV production, conferences, meetings, and basically any and all business as usual has been suspended in the US as individuals and institutions try to slow the spread of Covid-19. We have, at least, had outdoor space to go to—staying […]

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The Pandemic Has Led to a Huge, Global Drop in Air Pollution

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The coronavirus pandemic is shutting down industrial activity and temporarily slashing air pollution levels around the world, satellite imagery from the European Space Agency shows. One expert said the sudden shift represented the “largest-scale experiment ever,” in terms of the […]

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Fallout from Australia’s Huge Wildfires Is Choking Rivers

This story originally appeared on Yale Environment 360 and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Walking through the Bogandyera Nature Reserve, Luke Pearce, a fisheries manager for the Australian state of New South Wales, gestured down a steep hillside and described the scene three days after a wildfire roared through the area on January […]

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Want Electric Ships? Build A Better Battery

Later this year, the world’s largest all-electric container ship is expected to take its maiden voyage, setting sail from a port in Norway and traveling down the Scandanavian coast. Known as the Yara Birkeland, the ship was commissioned by Yara, a Norwegian fertilizer company, to move its product around the country. The company expects the […]

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Dolphins Are Still Accidental Casualties of Tuna Fishing

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Dolphin numbers in the Indian Ocean may have dropped by more than 80 percent in recent decades, with an estimated 4 million small cetaceans caught as “by-catch” in commercial tuna-fishing nets since 1950, according to a study. As many as […]

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Scientists Chase Snowflakes During the Warmest Winter Ever

Not counting this night’s grounded flight, McMurdie and colleagues have flown on 12 trips since the beginning of January. While that may seem like a lot, it’s actually about half of what they expected. There just haven’t been very many storms this year. NOAA officials say the 2019-2020 winter, which officially stretches from December to […]

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Hungry Animals Can Change How Badly a Landscape Burns

The study also considered other critters, specifically insects, that are raising the risk of fires thanks to their eating habits. When invasive species like bark beetles attack vegetation, the plants produce defensive compounds—like the organic polymer lignin—to make themselves less tasty. But the side effect is that they may also make themselves more flammable. If […]

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Hungry Animals Can Change How Severely a Landscape Burns

The study also considered other critters, specifically insects, that are raising the risk of fires thanks to their eating habits. When invasive species like bark beetles attack vegetation, the plants produce defensive compounds—like the organic polymer lignin—to make themselves less tasty. But the side effect is that they may also make themselves more flammable. If […]

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Think Ride Sharing Is Good for the Planet? Not So Fast

This story originally appeared on Mother Jones and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. For climate-conscious Americans, cars are tough: We can’t live with ’em, can’t live without ’em. Yet while ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft are reducing reliance on car ownership, they’re hardly solving our problems. According to a report released on […]

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The Sea Is Getting Warmer. Will the Shrimp Get Louder?

The ocean is normally a fairly noisy place, with the sounds of happy dolphins, lonely whales and diesel-chugging ships saturating the undersea world. But climate change may turn up the volume on this liquid symphony as warmer sea temperatures boost the volume of noise produced by the small but incredibly loud percussionist in this orchestra: […]

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Australia’s Bushfires Completely Blasted Through the Models

And as other researchers who contributed to the Nature Climate Change series point out, the unprecedented scale of this season’s bushfires, and the drier and warmer conditions that exacerbated them, are beyond normal parameters, anyway. “The widespread and prolonged drought conditions over the last two years have caused the entire eastern Australian forest area to […]

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‘Environmental DNA’ Lets Scientists Probe Underwater Life

Similar autonomous sampling technology is being used by several research teams to find out what’s living on tropical reefs, where scientists have placed multi-layer structures to attract the tiny organisms that call the reef home. The idea is to assess the diversity and density of “cryptic fauna”—the corals, sponges and soft-bodied animals that make up […]

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Bezos’ Earth Fund Should Invest in These Green Technologies

On Monday, Amazon CEO and world’s richest human Jeff Bezos announced he was pledging nearly 8 percent of his net worth to fight climate change. This money, known as the Bezos Earth Fund, will be used to support “any effort that offers a real possibility to help preserve and protect the natural world,” Bezos wrote […]

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Cities Fighting Climate Woes Hasten ‘Green Gentrification’

Boston’s plans to harden its waterfront against the perils of climate change—storm surge, flooding, and sea level rise—seem like an all-around win. The only way to keep a higher, more turbulent Atlantic out of South Boston and Charlestown is to build parks, bike paths, gardens, and landscaped berms with waterfront views. These are all things […]

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Cheap Nanoparticles Pave the Way for Carbon-Neutral Fuel

The Svartsengi power station sits on the banks of the Blue Lagoon, an artificial geothermal spring and one of Iceland’s most popular tourist attractions. For decades, it has supplied Icelanders with geothermal electricity and heat. The rub is that extracting this renewable energy from the ground requires fossil fuels to run the pumps. So in […]

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