The Global IT Outage Sends Hospitals Reeling

It was half past midnight Eastern Time when Andrew Rosenberg, an anesthesiologist and critical care doctor who works as chief information officer at Michigan Medicine, suddenly noticed that a substantial number of computers across the health care center had ceased to function. In the hospital’s parlance, it counted as a “catastrophic major incident.” “We do […]

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Health Care Should Be Designed for the Extremes of Life

“The adoption of new ideas and the pace of change in health care can lag behind other innovations that consumers experience every day,” says Yves Behar, an industrial designer and founder of design firm fuseproject. People, Behar continues, become frustrated when they contrast their experience in clinics and hospitals versus, for instance, the consumer experience […]

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US Government Awards Moderna $176 Million for mRNA Bird Flu Vaccine

The US government will pay Moderna $176 million to develop an mRNA vaccine against a pandemic influenza—an award given as the highly pathogenic bird flu virus H5N1 continues to spread widely among US dairy cattle. The funding flows through BARDA, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, as part of a new Rapid Response Partnership […]

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The UK’s NHS Going Digital Would Be Equivalent to Hiring Thousands of New Doctors

The NHS app could not only allow appointments to be made, but also let patients receive notifications about vaccine campaigns, health tests, cancer screening, and even upcoming clinical trials. “Clinical trials can use genomics to identify patients who will benefit from the latest treatments, but they struggle to recruit—not for a lack of people willing […]

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With AI Tools, Scientists Can Crack the Code of Life

In 2021, AI research lab DeepMind announced the development of its first digital biology neural network, AlphaFold. The model was capable of accurately predicting the 3D structure of proteins, which determines the functions that these molecules play. “We’re just floating bags of water moving around,” says Pushmeet Kohli, VP of research at DeepMind. “What makes […]

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Air So Polluted It Can Kill Isn’t Being Taken Seriously Enough

In 2010, three months before her seventh birthday, Ella Roberta suddenly developed a chest infection and a severe cough. Her mother, Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, took her to the local hospital in Lewisham, South East London, where she was initially diagnosed with asthma. In the following months, she got worse and began suffering from coughing syncope—coughing episodes […]

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Boring Architecture Is Starving Your Brain

Designer Thomas Heatherwick thinks the construction industry is in a crisis. “We’ve just got so used to buildings that are boring,” says the man behind London’s revived Routemaster bus, Google’s Bay View, and New York’s Little Island. “New buildings, again and again, are too flat, too plain, too straight, too shiny, too monotonous, too anonymous, […]

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Revolutionary Alzheimer’s Treatments Can’t Help Patients Who Go Undiagnosed

“The statistics are frightening: Dementia is the biggest killer in the UK. It has been the leading cause of death for women since 2011,” says Hilary Evans, CEO of Alzheimer’s Research UK and cochair of the UK Dementia Mission. “One in two of us will be affected by dementia either by caring for someone with […]

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With So Much Bird Flu Around, Are Eggs, Chicken, and Milk Still Safe to Consume?

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Recent outbreaks of bird flu—in US dairy herds, poultry farms in Australia, and elsewhere, and isolated cases in humans—have raised the issue of food safety. So can the virus transfer from infected farm animals to contaminate milk, meat, or eggs? How likely is […]

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The Case for MDMA’s Approval Is Riddled With Problems

The results sounds promising, but Michael Ostacher, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University who’s not involved with Lykos and wasn’t on the FDA panel, says there’s a big problem: “It’s unclear whether or not the participation in the study and anticipation of the effect is what makes people better, rather than the […]

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Wegovy Can Keep Weight Off for at Least 4 Years, Research Shows

A large, long-term trial of the weight-loss medication Wegovy (semaglutide) found that people tended to lose weight over the first 65 weeks on the drug—about one year and three months—but then hit a plateau or “set point.” But that early weight loss was generally maintained for up to four years while people continued taking the […]

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