Apple Donates Proceeds From John Lewis Documentary to Museums Honoring His Legacy

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Apple is donating proceeds that it receives from the “John Lewis: Good Trouble” documentary to museums that honor his legacy, Apple announced today.



Funds from the documentary, which was released on July 3, will be provided to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, and the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

“Representative John Lewis’s life and example compel each of us to continue the fight for racial equity and justice,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. “This film celebrates his undeniable legacy, and we felt it fitting to support two cultural institutions that continue his mission of educating people everywhere about the ongoing quest for equal rights.”

US Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis passed away on July 17. Apple over the weekend had a full page tribute on its website, and Apple CEO Tim Cook shared a commemorative tweet. Apple has also created a Spotlight collection of curated articles that remember Lewis and celebrate his legacy, plus there’s a collection of episodes that honor his life available on Apple Podcasts.

Apple customers in the United States and Canada can rent “John Lewis: Good Trouble” through the Apple TV app on Phone, iPad, ‌Apple TV‌, iPod touch, Mac, select Samsung and LG smart TVs, and Amazon Fire TV and Roku devices. “Good Trouble” takes audiences through Lewis’s more than 60 years of civil rights activism.

In her intimate account of legendary US Representative John Lewis’s life and legacy, director Dawn Porter takes audiences through his more than 60 years of extraordinary activism — from the bold teenager on the front lines of the civil rights movement to the legislative powerhouse he was throughout his career. After Lewis petitioned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to help integrate a segregated school in his hometown of Troy, Alabama, King sent “the boy from Troy” a roundtrip bus ticket to meet with him.

From that meeting onward, Lewis became one of King’s closest allies. Lewis organized Freedom Rides, which left him bloodied or jailed, and stood at the front lines in the historic marches on Washington and Selma. Lewis continued to protect civil rights as a member of Congress. He never lost the spirit of “the boy from Troy” and had called on his fellow Americans to get into “good trouble” until his passing on July 17, 2020. “John Lewis: Good Trouble” is a moving tribute to the real-life hero at the forefront of many hard-won battles for lasting change.

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